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Events Literacy News

Neil Mackay – International Presenter to Provide Great Opportunity for Teachers and Parents

AUSPELD will be proud to welcome Neil Mackay to Australia for a series of entertaining and educational workshops in 2012.

Neil Mackay is an educational consultant and trainer who created the concept of Dyslexia Friendly Schools in the UK. He is an experienced teacher who has taught for 26 years, working with children of all ages with a wide range of needs and abilities. There will be workshops for teachers in Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and Perth as well as parent workshops in some cities (TBA).

2012 Australian Tour Dates and Locations

WHEN

Brisbane – May 28th and 29th (visit www.speld.org.au for further details)

Sydney – June 1st and 2nd (visit www.speldnsw.org.au for further details)

Melbourne – June 6th and 7th (visit www.speldvic.org.au for further details)

Adelaide – June 9th (see http://www.speld-sa.org.au/images/workshops/neil%20mackay%20seminar.pdf)

Perth – June 12th and 13th (visit www.dsf.net.au for further details or register on-line today!)

Neil is known for his ability to bring the classroom into his training and for providing lively, entertaining and thought provoking opportunities for teachers and allied professionals to reflect on and develope their practice. He has written a number of books including the extremly popular Removing Dyslexia as a Barrier to Achievement and Taking the Hell out of Homework. Both books are available though AUSPELD, click here for info.

Click here for more info on Neil Mackay’s australian tour…

 

Categories
Advocacy News Other

The ‘Raising Children Network’ – A Great On-line Resource for Parents

This award winning website is targeted at providing assistance to parents of all children and contains some very useful information on how to help parents support children with learning difficulties. With interactive tutorials, discussion forums and an extraordinary amount of information this website will help any parent, not just those of children with learning difficulties, with the many challenges of raising children.

raisingchildren.net.au has already supported many parents, to see if it can help you please follow a relevant link below;

Learning disabilities: supporting your child

Helping your child build resilience and self-esteem

Learning disabilities in adolescence: FAQs

Categories
Advocacy News Research

Working Towards a Nationally Consistent Approach to the Collection of Information on Students with a Disability

A recent report produced by PricewaterhouseCoopers under contract of the Department of Education has provided some good news for those with learning disabilities.

In 2008, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreed to work towards a nationally consistent approach to the collection of information on students with disability. This approach took the form of a National Model developed under the guidance of an expert advisory group which met in 2010. The National Model was developed to gather comparable information about the numbers of students with disability and most importantly, the level of adjustment provided to students with disability.

This Model consists of a process to identify:
–  school students with a diagnosed disability, or a disability ‘validated’ by an Education Authority, as defined by the Disability Discrimination Act (1992), and then
–  information on the level of adjustment provided for these students. The adjustments are classified as – extensive,
substantial, supplementary or no adjustments
– Supplementary information on the type of disability under four groupings was also collected – physical, cognitive,
sensory, and social/emotional and the extent of adjustments (measures or actions) taken by a school or provider to
assist these students to access and participate in education on the same basis as students without disability. Collecting
information on student‘s disability is not the focus of the National Model, however, it provides more context to the
students‘ needs for adjustments in schools and provides a level of detail that will be valuable to educators and policy
makers.

To view the report in full please click here.